Wednesday, April 10, 2013

PHOTO: Volaris receives first Sharklet-equipped Airbus A320 aircraft


Mexico's Volaris welcomes it first Sharklet-equipped Airbus A320
Volaris welcomes it first Sharklet-equipped Airbus A320
Mexican low-cost carrier Volaris celebrated the delivery of its first Sharklet-equipped Airbus A320 with a special flight from Mexico City to Cancun earlier today.

As the first Mexico-based operator of the new fuel-saving wing tip devices, Volaris welcomed Airbus officials onto today’s flight, in addition to official representatives from France, Germany, Spain and United Kingdom.

Sharklets, which are 2.4 metres tall and made from light-weight composites, are being offered on new-build A320 Family aircraft.

They allow Airbus’ airline customers to reduce fuel burn up to four percent over longer sectors and reduce approximately 1,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions per aircraft per year.

What’s more, sharklets offer operators the flexibility of either adding an additional 100 nautical miles range or increased payload capability of up to 450 kilograms.

Volaris, which has an all-Airbus fleet, currently operates 43 A320 Family aircraft and has a backlog of 48. It has been the first carrier in Mexico to order the A320neo, with a purchase agreement for 44 aircraft, including 30 A320neo and 14 A320ceo.

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11 comments :

  1. Funny, they used to be called wing-lets....

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    1. Yanks call them 'winglets', Brits must prefer 'sharklets'.

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    2. Nope, first time I have heard of them referred to as "sharklets".

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    3. Same here, who came up with 'sharklets'?

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    4. Hi, this article explains the whole winglets and sharklets thing: http://www2.macleans.ca/2011/12/19/aviation-industry-on-a-wing-and-tip/

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    5. Henning HeinemannApril 16, 2013 at 7:12 AM

      Ahh, it's about patent infringement and not paying royalties, got it. Theft by any other name is still theft.

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    6. Aha, thanks Robeel. New one on me.

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    7. Proof we all have too much free time.... lol!

      Thanks for the article, I will share this one with my staff.

      Is EASA going to make amendments to the ATA chapters too...?

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    8. I still think that Winglets is a very good name for that addition to the wings. There is always someone who wants to get fancy and different. BAH HUMBUG.

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  2. Can someone tell me what is the big deal about wing tip fences. They are standard on all 320,330 340 380 aircraft. So someone gives them steroids and we are to be impressed. BTW Southwest started this on 737 about 5 years ago.

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    Replies
    1. They have been around much longer than five years... and Boeing perfected it in their wind tunnels.

      They reduce wing tip vortices, thus reducing the effects of Dutch-roll and drag. They improve air flow separation and reduce fuel consumption up to 8%. So this little idea makes the 737 have a longer range, not to mention the longer time in the air when you are dealing with complex approaches like mid-way, et. al.

      Many carriers using the 737-800 could now easily fly Boston to St. Lucia, packed with travelers, with room to spare. try that with a 200-300...

      So that is the big deal.. tomorrows lesson will be the advent of TCAS, and the end of Loran, Omega and carosel navigation.

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